ARRIVING IN STYLE -- Remington makes an entrance, clad in an Independence Fire Department shirt and red bandana, promenading through the crowd of people who came to celebrate his retirement/birthday party with him at the VFW Saturday Evening.
ARRIVING IN STYLE -- Remington makes an entrance, clad in an Independence Fire Department shirt and red bandana, promenading through the crowd of people who came to celebrate his retirement/birthday party with him at the VFW Saturday Evening.

It was very warm last Saturday night when the lone fire truck came blaring its siren up Myrtle street toward the VFW club. Once it reached the front of the club the door was opened to let out a very important dignitary of Independence. Remington, the Independence Firedog and the winningest Flushing dog in the history of the sport emerged to greet the huge crowd who had assembled to wish him a happy retirement and birthday. 

At the age of 12, Remington has finally decided to retire to his sofa on Remington Ranch and enjoy reflecting upon his accomplishments in the competitive hunting competition. 

"Remington will retire as the winningest Flushing dog in the history with nine different national titles as well as a Browning Tournament of Champions title during his 11 years of competition," said Rusty Baker, Remington's owner. He also placed in the top five at various national events in either the singles or doubles in 16 different events. It is a fact, Remington's winning percentage throughout his career is more than 31%. His placement percentage as a first, second and third places is 70% while competing in more than 200 events over his career. 

"The last time he won both singles and doubles nationals was for 2017 and awarded in March 2018. I ran him a couple of times after nationals but it was decided it was time for him to officially retire from competition," said Baker. 

Age has caught up with Remington, and it has become more evident that he struggles to move around but that hasn't stopped him from entertaining his many followers. 

"Because he has more difficulty getting around this will be his last Neewollah riding on the fire truck during the Grand Parade. He's at that point in his life where he can't get up or down like he did when he was younger," Baker said. 

Remington will also be retiring from his position with the IFD/EMS. "He was an integral part of our Fire Prevention and Safety Foundation program in the community for more than six years," Baker stated. 

The crowd assembled in the VFW for Remington's retirement party with an assortment of party snacks, in what someone said was Remington's dog bowls. However, the crowd was assured they were not and he took to the center of the room to show-off with some of his tricks, provided he was paid in Slim Jims for his performance. 

The crowd enjoyed the music of Caddywhompus and were entertained with a humorous speech from Chad Dunham of the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office. One of the stories Dunham shared was when Baker decided to take Remington to a hunting competition instead of riding on the fire truck in the Neewollah Grand Parade. According to Baker, he received several complaints from the public regarding Remington's absence from the parade. 

Remington had a reputation as a fundraiser. Anytime funds were needed for a community project it was Remington who was called on to flush them out. On several projects, he was the leading fundraiser raising several thousand dollars. He was so popular with the public most of his fundraising competitors conceded before the race would begin. 

The Fire Prevention program was another popular event Remington enjoyed. The program took him to the schools where the children were more interested in the dog than fire department personnel. 

It was former city manager, Paul Sasse who told Baker, after Remington's first appearance in the Neewollah Grand Parade, "The public may not remember you as the fire chief in Independence but they will always remember your dog (Remington)." 

What may be Remington's final fundraiser, gift donations were made to AWOL in Remington's name with needed supplies and cash.