FINISHED PROJECT — Ewing brothers, Landon, left, and Lane, right, crouch next to their
completed bale spear that was made by hand through precise welding skills they two
have learned. The bale spear will help the family in feeding their cattle on the farm.
Courtesy Photo
FINISHED PROJECT — Ewing brothers, Landon, left, and Lane, right, crouch next to their completed bale spear that was made by hand through precise welding skills they two have learned. The bale spear will help the family in feeding their cattle on the farm. Courtesy Photo
The term ‘family business’ can mean many things to many people. For Independence family Aaron and Kristi Ewing and their twin sons Lane and Landon Ewing, it means devotion, tradition, and lots of cows. “The history of the Ewing family to farm locally though goes all the way back four generations to 1910, when Aaron’s great grandfather, Thomas Milton Ewing, started farming in Montgomery County,” Kristi Ewing added. “Thomas named his farm ‘Cedarlane Holstein Farm’. Since that time, Cedarlane Holstein Farm has been operated by Thomas Ewing’s son, Harold Ewing, and now his grandson, Jerald Ewing (Aaron’s father).” After marriage, Aaron and Kristi Ewing, became the fourth generation of Ewing’s to farm, and Ewing Farms was born. Found just south of town, they began raising beef cattle, corn, wheat, soybeans, and hay. That was not the last exciting birth to be witnessed at the farm. In July of 2000, two new Ewing men were born to carry on the tradition of helping their dad on the farm. Sons Lane and Landon Ewing, now freshman at Independence High School, stay active in outdoor activities and sports including: baseball, basketball, tennis, cross country, hunting, fishing, helping their grandfather (Larry Jacobs) with mechanic work, and farming. The Ewing twins have a love of the outdoors like no other and help out on the farm daily, doing cattle chores, equipment maintenance, field work, and other farm errands. “Basically if they can drive it, operate it, or work on it, then they are interested in it!” Aaron Ewing, the proud father, said. Like most family farms in rural America, making a living with farming is tough and requires the Ewing’s to be adaptive and innovative. Aaron has a second job as a heavy equipment specialist for a local gas pipeline. Kristi stays busy with their other family-owned business, Heaven’s Angels. Located at 310 North Penn in downtown Independence, the store specializes in children’s clothing and specialty items. They introduced retail cuts of meat two years ago. “For many years, we have offered beef to be purchased (by whole or half) for custom processing,” said Kristi Ewing. “And this is a service we still provide for anyone who might be interested.” They decided to add individual and smaller cuts so that even more of their neighbors could enjoy their high-quality product. “Heaven’s Angels is the only retail location in the surrounding area to offer 100 percent locally raised beef,” Kristi said. “If you want to know where your beef comes from, then Heaven’s Angels is the place to purchase it. It truly is locally raised, right from their pasture, to the processor, to your plate...” Tradition is important to the Ewing’s, but so is time. In recent years the family has converted to no-till farming, saving time and allowing more tasks to be accomplished each day. Their cattle herd consists of crossbred cows bred to Angus and Gelbvieh bulls that the Ewing’s use to improve the herd. Aaron synchronizes and artificially breeds as many cows as time allows, which gives the Ewing family access to the genetics of some of the best bulls in the world. The Ewing’s are proud of the accomplishments of their small, family farm and the impact they have made in the industry at a local level. Aaron is certified with the National Beef Quality Assurance Program and has specific training on animal welfare, animal husbandry, environmental stewardship, food safety, and best management practices. He also serves as secretary of the Montgomery County Conservation District and Vice President of the Montgomery County Farm Bureau. Recently the family was awarded Farm Bureau’s Century Farm Award. For the Ewing family, home is where the farm is and they see the family business continuing for many generations to come. Just don’t ask any of them to tell you what a normal day on the farm is like. “As far as a ‘typical day’ on the farm... well, there really is no typical day, as each day is a new adventure with many new challenges and tasks,” said Kristi.