The USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) report regarding Kansas crop progress and conditions reveal winter wheat condition rated two percent very poor, seven percent poor, 40 percent fair, 43 percent good and eight percent excellent. The week ending March 10 had 0.9 suitable fieldwork days.

The USDA's NASS reports the total number of cattle and calves in the state of Kansas is up one percent from last  year. As of Jan. 1, 2019, Kansas cattle totaled in at 6.35 million, as opposed to 2018's 6.3 million. The all time high in the past 50 years was 6.99 million in 1974, and the all time low for Kansas over the past 50 years in 1960 with 4.42 million.  

All cows and heifers that were calved totaled 1.69 million, up two percent from last year. All beef cows totaled 1.53 million, up two percent from last year. Milk cows totaled 161,000, up three percent from last year. All heifers 500 pounds and over totaled 1.87 million, down two percent from last year. Steers weighing 500 pounds and over totaled 2.01 million, down slightly from last year. Bulls weighing 500 pounds or over totaled 95,000, a number unchanged from last year. Calves under 500 pounds totaled 685,000, up 11 percent from last year. All cattle on feed fed for slaughter in kansas totaled 2.43 million, down one precent from last year. The 2018 calf crop totaled 1.50 million, up five percent from 2017. 

The USDA's NASS report regarding Kansas crop progress and conditions reveal winter wheat condition rated two percent very poor, seven percent poor, 40 percent fair, 43 percent good and eight percent excellent. The week ending March 10 had 0.9 suitable fieldwork days.

According to some livestock handlers, whether is one of the reasons livestock is raised in Kansas. On average, there are approximately 267 sunny days per year and approximately 19 inches in precipitation a year.